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NATO used 'unknown substance' in bombing of Serbia

A report by the Civil Protection of the Moravica District about NATO's 1999 bombing will soon be submitted to the government's coordination body, which was set up to determine the consequences of NATO's bombing of Serbia for 78 days in 1999.

This report, quoted by the daily Vecernje Novosti, contains details related to the actions of NATO's aviation.

According to sources, one of the documents noted that on April 8 and 9, 1999, NATO planes dispersed yellow powder of unknown origin over the entire Gornji Milanovac municipality, followed a few days later by the dispersal of small crystals that caused allergic reactions in people.

"I remember that people noticed fine crystals, the size of a grain of sugar, in their fields," a resident of the Donji Branetici village told investigators and explained that people's eyes would tear up and skin itch in contact with the crystals.

"I heard that people in the village of Brusnica had similar problems. There was one woman who was covered in hives after collecting hay when the crystals fell on her hands, legs, and face," he added.

Phytopathologists from the Fruit Research Institute in Cacak have identified traces of extremely unusual diseases in plants. Immediately after the bombing, suddenly and without any clear reason, a number of forests on Zlatibor and Tara mountains withered, and this happened in those areas where the unknown substance is also believed to have been used by NATO.

The report noted that samples of these crystals were sent to the military clinic (VMA) in Belgrade for chemical and toxicological tests. The first finding by this medical institution was that "no toxic substances from the group of chemical weapons have been found". This, however, was not all, as the conclusions stated, among other things: "Using infrared spectrometry, it has been determined that this is a synthetic hydrocarbon polymer of an unknown spectrum, i.e., - an unknown molecule," the source noted.

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